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Authors: Pride and Prejudice Quotes, Famous Pride and Prejudice Quotes, Quotations, Sayings from Chapters 34-40
Related Quotes:   Sense and Sensibility
Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 1-15   Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 16-33
She was suddenly roused by the sound of the door-bell, and her spirits were a little fluttered by the idea of its being Colonel Fitzwilliam himself, who had once before called late in the evening, and might now come to inquire particularly after her. But this idea was soon banished, and her spirits were very differently affected, when, to her utter amazement, she saw Mr. Darcy walk into the room. In an hurried manner he immediately began an inquiry after her health, imputing his visit to a wish of hearing that she were better. She answered him with cold civility. He sat down for a few moments, and then getting up, walked about the room. Elizabeth was surprised, but said not a word. After a silence of several minutes, he came towards her in an agitated manner, and thus began:
"In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you."
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 34.
Elizabeth's astonishment was beyond expression. She stared, coloured, doubted, and was silent. This he considered sufficient encouragement; and the avowal of all that he felt, and had long felt for her, immediately followed. He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride. His sense of her inferiority — of its being a degradation — of the family obstacles which judgement had always opposed to inclination, were dwelt on with a warmth which seemed due to the consequence he was wounding, but was very unlikely to recommend his suit.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth's reaction when Darcy declares his love for her, Chapter 34.
I have no wish of denying that I did everything in my power to separate my friend from your sister, or that I rejoice in my success. Towards him I have been kinder than towards myself.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy to Elizabeth, Chapter 34.
You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared me the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentleman-like manner.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Darcy after he accuses her of only refusing his hand in marriage because of the way he proposed, Chapter 35.
The tumult of her mind, was now painfully great. She knew not how to support herself, and from actual weakness sat down and cried for half-an-hour. Her astonishment, as she reflected on what had passed, was increased by every review of it. That she should receive an offer of marriage from Mr. Darcy! That he should have been in love with her for so many months! So much in love as to wish to marry her in spite of all the objections which had made him prevent his friend's marrying her sister, and which must appear at least with equal force in his own case— was almost incredible! It was gratifying to have inspired unconsciously so strong an affection. But his pride, his abominable pride — his shameless avowal of what he had done with respect to Jane — his unpardonable assurance in acknowledging, though he could not justify it, and the unfeeling manner in which he had mentioned Mr. Wickham, his cruelty towards whom he had not attempted to deny, soon overcame the pity which the consideration of his attachment had for a moment excited.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth on her feelings towards Darcy, Chapter 34.
He expressed no regret for what he had done which satisfied her; his style was not penitent, but haughty. It was all pride and insolence.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 36.
"How despicably have I acted!' she cried. - 'I, who have prided myself on my discernment! - I, who have valued myself on my abilities!"
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth after she reads Darcy's letter and realizes she had no reason to despite him as she had, Chapter 36.
If I endeavor to undeceive people as to the rest of his conduct, who will believe me? The general prejudice against Mr. Darcy is so violent that it would be the death of half the good people in Meryton, to attempt to place him in an amiable light.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 40.
Well, my comfort is, I am sure Jane will die of a broken heart, and then he will be sorry for what he has done.
Pride and Prejudice
Mrs. Bennett about Bingley's treatment of her daughter Jane, Chapter 40.
Every disposition of the ground was good; and she looked on the whole scene, the river, the trees scattered on its banks, and the winding of the valley, as far as she could trace it.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth's first visit to Pemberley, Chapter 43.
There was certainly at this moment, in Elizabeth's mind, a more gentle sensation towards the original, that she had ever felt in the height of their acquaintance.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth's changing relationship with Darcy on first visit to Pemberley, Chapter 43.
The respect created by the conviction of his valuable qualities, though at first unwillingly admitted, had for some time ceased to be repugnant to her feelings; and it was now heightened into somewhat of a friendlier nature by the testimony so highly in his favour, and bringing forward his disposition in so amiable a light, which yesterday had produced.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth's feelings on Darcy, after her encounter with him at Pemberley and his visit to her, Chapter 44.
But that was only when I first knew her, for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy on Elizabeth, Chapter 45.
Loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex.
Pride and Prejudice
Mary, Chapter 47.
Ah! Jane, I take your place now, and you must go lower, because I am a married woman.
Pride and Prejudice
Lydia, Chapter 51.
The Bennets were speedily pronounced to be the luckiest family in the world, though only a few weeks before, when Lydia had first run way, they had been generally proved to be marked out for misfortune.
Pride and Prejudice
After Jane's engagement to Bingley is announced, Chapter 55.
Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?
Pride and Prejudice
Lady Catherine de Bourgh to Elizabeth on prospect of Darcy marrying into Bennett family, Chapter 56.
I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.
Pride and Prejudice.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Chapter 56.
Neither duty, nor honour, nor gratitude ... have any possible claim on me.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Chapter 56.
You ought certainly to forgive them as a Christian, but never to admit them in your sight, or allow their names to be mentioned in your hearing.
Pride and Prejudice
Mr. Collins in letter, Chapter 57.
For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?
Pride and Prejudice
Mr. Bennett, Chapter 57.
You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy to Elizabeth, Chapter 58.
They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth and Darcy, Chapter 58.
Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy to Elizabeth, Chapter 58.
I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle. As a child I was taught what was right, but I was not taught to correct my temper. I was given good principles, but left to follow them in pride and conceit. Unfortunately an only son (for many years an only child), I was spoilt by my parents, who, though good themselves (my father, particularly, all that was benevolent and amiable), allowed, encouraged, almost taught me to be selfish and overbearing; to care for none beyond my own family circle; to think meanly of all the rest of the world; to wish at least to think meanly of their sense and worth compared with my own. Such I was, from eight to eight and twenty; and such I might still have been but for you, dearest, loveliest Elizabeth! What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy to Elizabeth, Chapter 58.
I cannot fix on the hour, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy to Elizabeth who asked him to to account for having fallen in love with her, Chapter 60.
You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Darcy, Chapter 60.
Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 1-15   Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 16-33
Pride and Prejudice, a romantic comedy novel, was written by English author Jane Austen. Published in 1813, it is the most famous novel by Austen, who was born on December 16, 1775, and died on July 18, 1717.



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