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Authors: Pride and Prejudice Quotes, Famous Pride and Prejudice Quotes, Quotations, Sayings from Chapters 16-33
Related Quotes:   Sense and Sensibility
Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 1-15   Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 34-60
I had not thought Mr. Darcy so bad as this — though I have never liked him. I had not thought so very ill of him. I had supposed him to be despising his fellow-creatures in general, but did not suspect him of descending to such malicious revenge, such injustice, such inhumanity as this.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 16.
Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.
Pride and Prejudice
Jane Bennett, Chapter 17.
It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 18.
Mr. Wickham is blessed with such happy manners as may ensure his making friends — whether he may be equally capable of retaining them, is less certain.
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy, Chapter 18.
"Books— oh! no. I am sure we never read the same, or not with the same feelings."
"I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be no want of subject. We may compare our different opinions."
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth and Darcy, Chapter 18.
It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Darcy, Chapter 18.
I remember hearing you once say, Mr. Darcy, that you hardly ever forgave, that your resentment once created was unappeasable. You are very cautious, I suppose, as to its being created.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Darcy, Chapter 18.
"May I ask to what these questions tend?"
"Merely to the illustration of your character," said she, endeavouring to shake off her gravity. "I am trying to make it out."
"And what is your success?"
She shook her head. "I do not get on at all. I hear such different accounts of you as puzzle me exceedingly."
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy and Elizabeth, Chapter 18.
"I can readily believe," answered he gravely, "that reports may vary greatly with respect to me; and I could wish, Miss Bennet, that you were not to sketch my character at the present moment, as there is reason to fear that the performance would reflect no credit on either."
"But if I do not take your likeness now, I may never have another opportunity."
Pride and Prejudice
Darcy and Elizabeth, Chapter 18.
To Elizabeth it appeared, that had her family made an agreement to expose themselves as much as they could during the evening, it would have been impossible for them to play their parts with more spirit, or finer success; and happy did she think it for Bingley and her sister that some of the exhibition had escaped his notice, and that his feelings were not of a sort to be much distressed by the folly which he must have witnessed.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 18.
I do assure you that I am not one of those young ladies (if such young ladies there are) who are so daring as to risk their happiness on the chance of being asked a second time. I am perfectly serious in my refusal. You could not make me happy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman in the world who could make you so.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Mr. Collins whose marriage proposal she has refused, Chapter 19.
Indeed, Mr. Collins, all praise of me will be unnecessary. You must give me leave to judge for myself, and pay me the compliment of believing what I say. I wish you very happy and very rich, and by refusing you hand, do all in my power to prevent your being otherwise.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Mr. Collins, Chapter 19.
"Really, Mr. Collins," cried Elizabeth with some warmth, "you puzzle me exceedingly. If what I have hitherto said can appear to you in the form of encouragement, I know not how to express my refusal in such a way as to convince you of its being one."
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 19.
I do assure you, Sir, that I have no pretension whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man. I would rather be paid the compliment of being believed sincere. I thank you again and again for the honour you have done me in your proposals, but to accept them is absolutely impossible. My feelings in every respect forbid it. Can I speak plainer? Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to plague you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Mr. Collins, Chapter 19.
To such perseverance in wilful self-deception, Elizabeth would make no reply, and immediately and in silence withdrew; determined, that if he persisted in considering her repeated refusals as flattering encouragement, to apply to her father, whose negative might be uttered in such a manner as must be decisive, and whose behaviour at least could not be mistaken for the affectation and coquetry of an elegant female.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth on the persistence of Mr. Collins in proposing marriage, Chapter 19.
An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.
Pride and Prejudice
Mr. Bennet to Elizabeth, Chapter 20.
Without thinking highly either of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 22.
The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 24.
My dear Lizzy, do not give way to such feelings as these. They will ruin your happiness. You do not make allowance enough for difference of situation and temper. Consider Mr. Collins's respectability, and Charlotte's steady, prudent character. Remember that she is one of a large family; that as to fortune, it is a most eligible match; and be ready to believe, for everybody's sake, that she may feel something like regard and esteem for our cousin.
Pride and Prejudice
Jane to Elizabeth, Chapter 24.
Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man; you know he is, as well as I do; and you must feel, as well as I do, that the woman who married him cannot have a proper way of thinking.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth to Jane, Chapter 24.
It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us. Women fancy admiration means more than it does.
Pride and Prejudice
Jane, Chapter 24.
We do not suffer by accident. It does not often happen that the interference of friends will persuade a young man of independent fortune to think no more of a girl whom he was violently in love with only a few days before.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 25.
I never saw a more promising inclination; he was growing quite inattentive to other people, and wholly engrossed by her. Every time they met, it was more decided and remarkable. At his own ball he offended two or three young ladies, by not asking them to dance; and I spoke to him twice myself, without receiving an answer. Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth on Mr. Bingley's love for Jane, Chapter 25.
What is the difference in matrimonial affairs, between the mercenary and the prudent move? What does discretion end, and avarice begin?
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 27.
Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 27.
Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains.
Pride and Prejudice
Elizabeth, Chapter 27.
"I like her appearance," said Elizabeth, struck with other ideas. "She looks sickly and cross. Yes, she will do for him very well. She will make him a very proper wife."
Pride and Prejudice
Referring to Lady Catherine de Bourgh's daughter Anne and Darcy, Chapter 28.
"I certainly have not the talent which some people possess," said Darcy, "of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done."
"My fingers," said Elizabeth, "do not move over this instrument in the masterly manner which I see so many women's do. They have not the same force or rapidity, and do not preoduce the same expression. But then I have always supposed it to be my own fault - because I would not take the trouble of practising.".
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 31.
More than once did Elizabeth, in her ramble within the park, unexpectedly meet Mr. Darcy. She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers. How it could occur a second time, therefore, was very odd! Yet it did, and even a third. It seemed like wilful ill-nature, or a voluntary penance, for on these occasions it was not merely a few formal inquiries and an awkward pause and then away, but he actually thought it necessary to turn back and walk with her.
Pride and Prejudice
Chapter 33.
Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 1-15   Pride and Prejudice, Chapters 34-60
Pride and Prejudice, a romantic comedy novel, was written by English author Jane Austen. Published in 1813, it is the most famous novel by Austen, who was born on December 16, 1775, and died on July 18, 1717.



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