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Shakespeare Insults, Put-Downs and Cusses - 12
Shakespeare Insults 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12
A fiend like thee might bear my soul to hell.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 3. 4

What manner of man is he.
Nothing of that wonderful promise, to read him by his form.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 3. 4

I have not seen such a Firago.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 3. 4

I hate ingratitude more in a man
Than lying, vainness, babbling drunkenness,
Or any taint of vice, whose strong corruption
Inhabits our frail blood.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 3. 4

A very dishonest paltry boy, and more a coward than a hare.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 3. 4

A coward, a most devout coward, religious in it.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 3. 4

I would not be in some of your coats for twopence.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 4. 1

Ungracious wretch,
Fit for the mountains and the barbarous caves,
Where manners ne'er were preach'd! Out of my sight.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 4. 1

Out, hyperbolical fiend.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 4. 2

Fie, thou dishonest Satan! (I call thee by the most modest terms, for I am one of those gentle ones that will use the devil himself with courtesy.)
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 4. 2

Leave thy vain bibble babble.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 4. 2

I'll ne'er believe a madman till I see his brains.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 4. 2

An ass-head, and a coxcomb, and a knave, a thin-faced knave, a gull.
William Shakespeare
Twelfth Night, 5. 1

This babble shall not henceforth trouble me.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 1. 2

I throw thy name against the bruising stones.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 1. 2

The sourest-natured dog that lives.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 2. 3

He is a stone, a very pebble stone.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 2. 3

If you spend word for word with me, I shall make your wit bankrupt.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 2. 4

What braggardism is this.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 2. 4

She is peevish, sullen, froward,
Proud, disobedient, stubborn, lacking duty.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 3. 1

That man that hath a tongue, I say is no man,
If with his tongue he cannot win a woman.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 3. 1

O illiterate loiterer.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 3. 1

'Bastard virtues'; that indeed know not their fathers, and therefore have no names.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 3. 1

She hath more hair than wit, and more faults than hairs, and more wealth than faults.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 3. 1

She is lumpish, heavy, melancholy.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 3. 2

Thou subtle, perjur'd, false, disloyal man.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 4. 2

How now you whoreson peasant! Where have you been these two days loitering.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 4. 4

I hold him but a fool that will endanger
His body for a girl that loves him not.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 5. 4

Degenerate and base art thou.
William Shakespeare
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 5. 4

Small winds shake him.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 1. 2

Men are mad things.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 2. 2

You play the child extremely.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 2. 2

I shall live
To knock your brains out.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 2. 2

Thou bring'st such pelting scurvy news continually,
Thou art not worthy life.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 2. 2

To marry him is hopeless,
To be his whore is witless.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 2. 4

I'll proclaim him,
And to his face, no man.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 2. 6

A very thief in love, a chaffy lord,
Not worth the name of villain.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 3. 1

She's lost past all cure.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 4. 1

I think she has a perturbed mind, which I cannot minister to.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 4. 3

Pig-like he whines.
William Shakespeare
The Two Noble Kinsmen, 5. 4

We'll thwack him hence with distaffs.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 1. 2

Many a man there is (even at this present,
Now, while I speak this) holds his wife by th' arm,
That little thinks she has been sluic'd in 's absence
And his pond fish'd by his next neighbour, by
Sir Smile, his neighbour.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 1. 2

My wife's a hobby-horse.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 1. 2

I hate thee,
Pronounce thee a gross lout, a mindless slave,
Or else a hovering temporizer that
Canst with thine eyes at once see good and evil,
Inclining to them both.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 1. 2

Go rot.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 1. 2

Be intelligent to me.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 1. 2

Hated too, worse than the great'st infection that e'er was heard of read.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 1. 2

She is spread of late into a goodly bulk.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 2. 1

Either thou art most ignorant by age, or thou wert born a fool.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 2. 1

A callot
Of boundless tongue, who late hath beat her husband,
And now baits me.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 2. 3

A feather for each wind that blows.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 2. 3

Female bastard.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 2. 3

So lean that blasts of January
Would blow you through and through.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

Good sooth, she is the queen of curds and cream.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

Stench-mouthed rascal.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

Is there no manners left among maids.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

She longed to eat adders' heads and toads carbonadoed.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

Thou fresh piece of excellent witchcraft.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

I see this is the time that the unjust man doth thrive.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

Pedlar's excrement.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

You are rough and hairy.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4

His garments are rich, but he wears them not handsomely.
William Shakespeare
The Winter's Tale, 4. 4
Shakespeare Insults 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 12


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